As a child, I recall pedaling my red tractor to the opposite end of the street to visit Bob, my dearest childhood friend. Although my parents did their best to deter my steady efforts to travel this urban road, I was urged on by the personal friendship that awaited at my journey's end. Still, to this day, I can recall the sound of asphalt rumbling beneath my solid rubber tires, as well as the sudden jolts brought on by the road's irregular surface and the occasional need to rest along a shoulder made of pebbles and broken asphalt.

As Bob and I grew older and acquired more sophisticated riding apparatuses, we explored our neighborhood roads and well beyond. Our travels took us to, what seemed at that time, extraordinary places and magical adventures. I sported a chocolate colored "Huffy" bicycle that was described by the bike dealer as "indestructible" and Bob sped alongside me on a black "Hercules" bike. We spent our summer days exploring the endless roads and trails that extended beyond our familiar surroundings. Each new path provided opportunities for excitement, wonder and discovery. It is undoubtedly this early history that would later become the foundation for my interest in roads as a therapeutic metaphor.

Although my "Huffy" bike has long since fallen apart and my companionship with Bob faded, I still continue to travel numerous roads and paths. It is, in part, my fascination with roads that has inspired me to spend the past twelve years investigating the applicability of utilizing roads as a drawing directive in art therapy. This book is a result of my exploration and experiences.

I have organized the book so that it can be read, and the technique applied, in a short period of time. The first part of the book furnishes theory, method, and application of the road drawing technique. This is followed by several sample drawings. These examples are intended to illustrate the kinds of drawings a clinician may encounter. However, the reader should keep in mind that each person is unique, hence there is no single drawing or element of a drawing that will serve as a typical example.